Night at the museum: Microbiome exhibit leaves a doctor humbled

first_img My eyes were drawn to the unusual name: Bacillus subtilis. As an infectious disease specialist at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, I had expected to recognize all of the bacteria in the room, but here I drew a blank.As I scanned my brain, a putrid odor hit my nostrils. Next to me, a smiling man was vigorously wafting a disgusting scent in my direction. The pungent smell of sweaty feet did more to teach me about what Bacillus subtilis does than my years of medical training. “And this one,” he said, as he moved his hand above a different canister, “this one’s stinky cheese!”We were on the third floor of the American Museum of Natural History, and the man toying with my senses was Robert DeSalle, co-curator of “The Secret World Inside You.” The new exhibit, which opened this week and runs through August 2016, explores how we co-exist with the wild array of microbes living in and upon us — collectively known as the microbiome.advertisement A digital rendering of the Toxoplasma gondii parasite, which appears in the interactive table of “The Secret World Inside You” at the American Museum of Natural History. AMNH By Matt McCarthy Nov. 13, 2015 Reprints Matt McCarthy HealthNight at the museum: Microbiome exhibit leaves a doctor humbled A model of human skin cells and rod-shaped bacteria locked in battle with a fungus that causes athlete’s foot. R. Mickens/AMNHIt didn’t take long to recognize that he was right. The exhibit is heavily referenced. But unlike most of the academic papers I’m used to reading, “Secret World” is visually stunning, with a 14-foot talking woman and a kaleidoscope of mind-altering images representing the most unusual and important organisms on the planet.DeSalle took me deeper inside the exhibit, to what appeared to be a pinball machine. It was actually an interactive module. “You can build your own microbiome,” he said. “Check it out.”I selected food from my normal diet — rice, popcorn, lentils, an occasional lollipop — and, like the classic arcade game, plunged these foodstuffs deep into my hypothetical microbiome, where they bounced around racking up points. As I played, children lined up behind me. They would have to wait.I clicked an image and suddenly my microbiome exploded. I had inadvertently swallowed a broad-spectrum antibiotic. Then an icon appeared that looked like a giant turd. It represented a fecal transplant.Listen to the Signal podcast: We are a constellation of our microbiome and ourselves“This is really cool,” DeSalle said, pointing at the brown pile. “Now you have a C. diff infection and you need a transplant. This is what the microbiome is all about!” Many of the finer points of antibiotic use that I had tried (in vain) to convey to my own patients were clearly and vividly presented in this simple pinball game.I thought about the ways I had stumbled through telling patients about probiotics or warning them against indiscriminate antibiotic use. “It’s complicated,” I’d say. As eyelids grew heavy, I’d reassure myself that this stuff is inherently dull: Hey, it’s not my fault the truth is boring.Oh, how wrong I have been.How we interact with our microbial partners is perhaps the most exciting frontier in medicine. Hardly a week goes by without a crucial new finding related to how these bacteria impact our lives. More than a dozen companies have launched in recent years to develop microbiome-modulating therapies. Unfortunately, the latest science on how this microbial world affects our health is rarely presented in an accessible, engaging way, or in a format that’s easily digestible. This exhibit changes that.A 14-foot projection of a pregnant woman’s body is part of an interactive table that highlights ways that microbes impact human health. D. Finnin/AMNH“One of the best things about this,” DeSalle said as we eventually moved on, “is the response from kids. They come away from the exhibit realizing that we share our bodies with all of these other organisms!”Dare I say his enthusiasm was infectious?As the children explored the modules, adults stood on the periphery, contemplating a host of provocative questions posed on the walls: Why do poor people take more antibiotics? Could microbes play a role in human autism? Or obesity? Can bacteria make you depressed?The detail that will ultimately stick with me is this: Over 70 percent of the antibiotics in the United States are fed to livestock to make them gain weight, not to cure disease.The exhibit concludes with a live, interactive presentation called “Microbes and You,” in a bright room that resembles an ice cream parlor. It’s led by an instructor in a lab coat, who poses questions about the microbes living everywhere from your belly button to your television set. This segment has potential, but it’s still finding its footing. The docent leading my session apologized and said she wasn’t sure if she had pronounced Corynebacterium properly. (She had not.)It’s the least essential part of the exhibit, and, frankly, your time is better spent exploring the modules and videos. I hope all of my patients get to see it. You should, too.Dr. Matt McCarthy is an assistant professor of medicine at Weill Cornell Medicine and the author of “The Real Doctor Will See You Shortly.” DeSalle took me around the exhibit after I had finished seeing patients on Tuesday. As we entered a dimly lit room, we were met by a dazzling array of suspended lights and a sign with a gentle reminder: Bacteria are living things. They are not trying to hurt you. They are not trying to help you. They are just trying to stay alive, like the rest of us.A moment later, he and I were standing in front of a large video monitor, where one of my colleagues, Dr. Ian Lipkin, director of Columbia University’s Center for Infection and Immunity, was explaining why bacteria are becoming increasingly resistant to antibiotics. “The information presented here,” DeSalle told me, “is from scientific articles and world experts.”advertisement Tags bacteriafecal transplantmicrobiome About the Author Reprintslast_img read more

France to tighten drug trial rules after fatal incident

first_img Scientists call for more details about drug used in deadly French clinical trial About the Author Reprints Related: Associated Press “This accident should have been reported without delay to the National Agency for Drug Safety,” she said. “But the laboratory only reported it formally on Thursday, Jan. 14, four days after the first volunteer was taken to a hospital and three days after the decision was made to suspend the test.” In the LabFrance to tighten drug trial rules after fatal incident PARIS — French authorities unveiled a plan on Monday to tighten the rules regarding human drug trials following an experimental test that killed a volunteer and left five others hospitalized in January.The French health minister, Marisol Touraine, also demanded that the Biotrial company which carried out the fatal trial provide an action plan within a month to guarantee that “major breaches” cannot happen again.“If they don’t, we will suspend their activities. If this report is handed in, we will carry out verifications by the end of the year,” Touraine said in a news conference.advertisementcenter_img David Vincent/AP The trial for the Portuguese pharmaceutical company Bial involved 90 healthy volunteers. It was stopped after six people became seriously ill, and one died. Touraine stressed that the investigation by the health administration showed that the conditions under which the trial by the Rennes-based firm were authorized were “compliant with the current legislation,” but there were breaches in the way Biotral handled the problem.advertisement Tags clinical trialsdrug development By Associated Press May 23, 2016 Reprintslast_img read more

Pharmalot, Pharmalittle: Allergan CEO predicts Trump will be ‘vicious’ on drug pricing

first_imgA federal court jury in Dallas ordered Johnson & Johnson and its DePuy Orthopaedics subsidiary to pay more than $1 billion in damages Thursday for “despicable and vile conduct” in selling Pinnacle metal-on-metal hip implants that they knew were seriously defective, the Dallas News reports. The trial was the third in a series of bellwether cases, and more than 8,900 lawsuits have been filed against Johnson & Johnson across the county.File this under “how ironic.” The European Medicines Agency’s Pharmacovigilance Risk Assessment Committee is reviewing injectable medicines that are used for treating severe, rapidly developing allergic reactions because they contain lactose, which may contain traces of cow’s milk proteins. The problem is that the some patients may be allergic to the proteins themselves, according to this notice.A deal in which Valeant Pharmaceuticals hoped to sell its Salix unit to Takeda Pharmaceuticals fell apart, adding new pressure on the drug maker to pay down about $30 billion in debt, Bloomberg News notes. At the same time, the Securities and Exchange Commission released correspondence with Valeant showing the drug maker will have to revise the way it disclosed some earnings measures. The agency raised questions about its accounting methods.The UK’s National Institute for Health and Care Excellence endorsed the Keytruda to treat non-small cell lung cancer after Merck provided added data and reduced the price, PharmaTimes says. At the same time, NICE reversed an earlier decision and agreed to recommended a GlaxoSmithKline drug called Nucala for asthma after the company cut the price and provided new data on cost effectiveness, PMLive writes.India’s Delhi High Court set aside a government notification that last March banned 344 fixed dose combination medicines, the Economic Times tells us. Those combinations included several therapeutic areas like cough and cold syrups, respiratory formulations, and topical dermatological medicines. The government banned the combinations on the grounds they were not approved elsewhere in the world or not required in India due to better alternatives.A multiple myeloma treatment, which is being developed by Bluebird Bio and Celgene, helped patients who previously were not helped by repeated treatments in a nine-patient study, Reuters writes.Boehringer Ingelheim is cutting more than 240 jobs, including 120 involved in small molecule discovery research in Connecticut, about five months after chopping 725 US jobs, Endpoints says. Alex Hogan/STAT [email protected] By Ed Silverman Dec. 2, 2016 Reprints About the Author Reprints And so, another working week will soon draw to a close. Not a moment too soon, yes? This is, as you know, our treasured signal to daydream about weekend plans. And our agenda is rather modest. We expect to spend hours raking millions of leaves from the Pharmalot grounds, taking a well-deserved nap, and catching up on our reading. And what about you? This may be a good time to boost the economy by starting your holiday shopping. You could make time for someone special. Or try to predict the future, which looks quite interesting. Well, whatever you do, have a grand time, but be safe. Enjoy, and see you soon …Allergen chief executive Brent Saunders believes President-elect Donald Trump “will be more vicious and more focused on taking down” drug makers over pricing. “I worry pharma has a false sense of relief or security because of a Trump administration or Republican-controlled Congress. We have to realize drug pricing issue is a populist issue and the American people are angry,” he said at the Forbes Healthcare Summit on Thursday. “If you think Trump is not a populist and he won’t jump on the next scandal … you’re fooling yourself.”Representative Tom Price, the nominee to head the Department of Health and Human Services, may have his own conflicts of interest, STAT tells us. The orthopedic surgeon has a stock portfolio that includes investments in drug and device makers, as well as health insurers. As part of the nomination process, his holdings will be reviewed by the White House counsel’s office, the Office of Government Ethics, and the ethics division at HHS.advertisement Andrew Witty reflects on his tenure as prepares to retire from GlaxoSmithKline. “Where is some of the discontent [toward companies] coming from? Some of that I think is coming from the perspective that … companies aren’t necessarily doing as much as ‘the people’ would like to see done on broader societal issues, whether that’s environmental, whether it’s access to medicine — there are a number of these themes,” he tells the Guardian.Vertex Pharmaceuticals asked Ireland’s health minister to directly negotiate with Ireland’s HSE, which is the national health service, to provide coverage for its Orkambi cystic fibrosis treatment, the Journal reports. The HSE appears ready to reject Orkambi because Vertex failed to reduce the price after five months of negotiations. The National Centre for Pharmacoeconomics estimates the drug would cost about $415 million over five years.advertisementcenter_img Ed Silverman Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. @Pharmalot PharmalotPharmalot, Pharmalittle: Allergan CEO predicts Trump will be ‘vicious’ on drug pricing Tags Donald Trumpdrug pricespharmaceuticalslast_img read more

10 stories that are key to understanding 2017

first_img8. Promise and peril: One promising cancer therapy shows the curvy route toward FDA approvalCAR-T experiments come with major promise, but they also come with a risk: The treatment has to nearly kill you to save you.Read The Story [email protected] Don’t Miss10 stories that are key to understanding 2017 9. Scientists consider ways to harness the power of gene driveGene drives enable genetic modifications to a single organism to spread rapidly through the entire population by ensuring that targeted genes are passed on to nearly all offspring. But some scientists are urging caution, noting the consequences of even controlled experiments to, say, prevent infectious diseases such as malaria may not be fully understood.Read The Story 3. Watch out for more big-dollar biotech deals that may obscure a subdued realityBy touting a towering sum for one agreement, however speculative, a biotech company might be able to exert some leverage the next time it seeks a partner from big pharma. The problem: Sometimes a billion dollars is not a billion dollars. Read The Story 4. Zika sparked global alarm in 2016. Could the world see a vaccine in 2017?Development is actually occurring at warp-speed rates in comparison with the development of other vaccines, with more clinical trials scheduled in 2017. But when the trials are done, will there be a market for a Zika vaccine?Read The Story By David Beard Dec. 29, 2016 Reprints About the Author Reprints From the spread of Zika virus to a nasty dispute over the gene-editing technology CRISPR, 2016 has been a fascinating year for science and medicine. But past is also prologue, and a look back at some of this past year’s STAT coverage gives us a sense of what the next year could bring. Here are synopses of several stories that provide key background for the year to come, along with links if you want to go deeper.1. Scientists are mapping the way toward the creation of a human genome from scratchThe organizers of the project expect its very existence to drive down the cost of splicing together the chemical “letters” that constitute DNA into whole genomes — eventually producing a man-made version of the complete genetic blueprint for a human being. Read The Storyadvertisement Alex Hogan/STAT 6. An accelerated process to approve new drugs (advocates hope)Behind the new 21st Century Cures Act passed by Congress in December, there’s a dirty secret: many provisions don’t provide a clear path for implementation. That said, there are set deadlines on moving toward faster drug approvals.Read The Storycenter_img Tags biotechnologyCRISPRgeneticsopioidspharmaceuticalsWhite Housewomen’s healthZika Virus Read The Story 5. We’ll see more fights over reproductive rights. Here’s a look at one tactic from abortion opponents.Lawmakers are seeking to introduce personhood bills in Wisconsin, Alabama, South Carolina, and Mississippi. The first step in some states may be fetal tax credits for expectant parents.Read The Story Readers, are there other critical areas you’d suggest we focus on in the year to come? Let us know in the comments section below. 10. How will drug makers fare in Trump’s new Washington?Donald Trump’s ascent in Washington is generating whispers at the highest levels of industry about whether the Republican Party will remain a staunch ally of drug companies. Is Trump’s criticism of the drug industry an aberration — or is he a sign of things to come?Read The Story David Beard 2. The fight over who owns the rights to CRISPR is expected to come to a headIt won’t be easy for patent office judges to decide just how obvious it was to move from one team’s editing of DNA in a test tube to another’s doing it in eukaryotic cells, the kind in animals from mice to people. The stakes are high.advertisement @dabeard 7. As deaths mount, will the public learn more about how deadly opioid painkillers were marketed?The aggressive marketing of OxyContin has been blamed for helping to trigger a national epidemic of opioid abuse. A judge’s ruling to unseal records sought by STAT that could shed more light on the issue will be reviewed by a Kentucky appeals court in 2017.Read The StoryRelated: 52 weeks, 52 faces: Obituaries narrate lives lost to the opioid epidemiclast_img read more

Q&A: A nonprofit tries a deep-dive fix for making medicines accessible

first_img GET STARTED Q&A: A nonprofit tries a deep-dive fix for making medicines accessible [email protected] What’s included? About the Author Reprints Pharmalot Log In | Learn More A committee assembled by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine looked at access to affordable medicines. Carl Clifford / Creative Commons Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTEDcenter_img Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. What is it? @Pharmalot As national angst over pharmaceutical pricing accelerates, one private nonprofit is hoping to provide some long-term solutions. Last year, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine assembled a committee of experts from academia and industry to make recommendations on the larger issue of access to affordable medicines. The topics to be reviewed include drug patents; health insurance; government health care programs; changing finances of physician practices; ways to prevent drug shortages, and how to compare the effectiveness of medicines. A report is due in July, so we chatted with Sharyl Nass, who is director of the Board on Health Care Services, which is part of the National Academies and that organized the committee, about what to expect. This is an excerpt from our conversation …Pharmalot: How did this come about? Ed Silverman Tags drug pricingpharmaceuticalsSTAT+ STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. By Ed Silverman Jan. 25, 2017 Reprintslast_img read more

A new California drug pricing transparency bill clears its first hurdle

first_img What is it? @Pharmalot Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. A California bill aimed at providing transparency into prescription drug pricing moved a step closer to reality on Wednesday when a Senate committee approved the legislation.In a 7 to 2 vote, the state’s Senate Health Committee supported the idea that drug makers should notify state officials about planned price hikes and also justify those increases. The legislation would also require health plans to provide detailed information about drug costs and the portion of premiums attributed to this expense. A new California drug pricing transparency bill clears its first hurdle Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. What’s included? Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED Pharmalot By Ed Silverman April 20, 2017 Reprintscenter_img STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Ed Silverman About the Author Reprints Log In | Learn More California state Senator Ed Hernandez. Rich Pedroncelli/AP [email protected] GET STARTED Tags drug pricingpharmaceuticalsSTAT+last_img read more

Collins grilled on overhead payments from NIH to research universities

first_img Log In | Learn More Representative Andy Harris, R-Md., questioned NIH Director Francis Collins at an appropriations hearing. Cliff Owen/AP What’s included? Collins grilled on overhead payments from NIH to research universities Lev Facher Unlock this article — plus daily intelligence on Capitol Hill and the life sciences industry — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTED WASHINGTON — Congressman Andy Harris of Maryland on Wednesday railed against the National Institutes of Health for how much it pays research universities for their indirect costs, reigniting a debate that began when the Trump administration defended its proposed $5.8 billion cut to the agency’s budget for 2018.Harris, a Republican and a physician who has conducted NIH-funded research, aggressively questioned NIH Director Francis Collins at an appropriations hearing, demanding to know how much money, proportional to funding meant directly for research, the NIH provided to universities to cover overhead costs. These costs include buying lab equipment and paying for utilities, for example. [email protected] What is it? STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond.center_img Washington Correspondent Lev Facher covers the politics of health and life sciences. About the Author Reprints @levfacher Tags policypoliticsresearchSTAT+ Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Politics By Lev Facher May 17, 2017 Reprints GET STARTEDlast_img read more

FDA to delay rule requiring new nutrition facts panel on food

first_imgPreviously, the FDA had given companies until July 26, 2018, to comply, with smaller food makers getting an extra year. On Tuesday, the FDA said it intends to give companies additional time to be in compliance. It did not provide a specific deadline. Spokeswoman Deborah Kotz said in an email that details will be released at a later date.The Grocery Manufacturers Association and other industry groups had asked for the deadline to be pushed to 2021, according to a letter sent earlier this year to Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price, who was appointed by President Trump. The letter was obtained by the health advocacy group Center for Science in the Public Interest.advertisement By Associated Press June 13, 2017 Reprints HealthFDA to delay rule requiring new nutrition facts panel on food Tags nutrition Please enter a valid email address. NEW YORK — A revamped nutrition facts panel designed to make it easier to see how many calories and added sugars are in packaged foods and drinks is being delayed.The Food and Drug Administration said Tuesday it plans to push back the deadline for a rule requiring food companies to use the new label. It’s the Trump administration’s latest delay of the Obama administration’s rules intended to improve food labeling and make foods healthier and safer.The revised nutrition facts panel would make the calorie counts on packaged food and drinks more prominent, adjust serving sizes to be more realistic and specify the amount of added sugars in products. The labels currently list how many total sugars are in a product, including those that are naturally occurring, such as in fruit and milk.advertisement Leave this field empty if you’re human: In a statement, the Grocery Manufacturers Association said food and beverage companies want to help people make informed choices, but that the “fast-approaching compliance deadline” was difficult to meet without final guidance from the FDA on certain details.Jim O’Hara, director of health promotion policy for CSPI, said that the delay will only cause confusion as some companies switch to the new label as planned, ahead of others.“The longer you draw this out, the more confusing the marketplace becomes,” he said.Candy maker Mars Inc., for instance, said it is still planning to start rolling out the new nutrition facts panel on select products in coming months and be in full compliance by next year.Spokesman Brad Figel noted that postponing the deadline for too long would result in there being two nutrition facts panels in the marketplace for an extended period of time. Still, he said he wasn’t surprised by the FDA’s decision.“There’s just been a lot of pressure to extend the deadline,” Figel said.The FDA also recently delayed a rule that would require restaurants, grocery, and convenience store chains to post calorie counts for prepared foods. That rule was supposed to go into effect last month, but was delayed until next year. That is also leading to inconsistency in what people see, since some businesses had already started posting the calorie counts in anticipation of the previous deadline.The Agriculture Department has also delayed animal welfare standards for organic foods and sodium standards for federally subsidized school lunches.center_img Associated Press About the Author Reprints Newsletters Sign up for Morning Rounds Your daily dose of news in health and medicine. J. David Ake/AP Privacy Policylast_img read more

Powerful Senate committee launches bipartisan probe into insulin pricing

first_img Nicholas Florko Powerful Senate committee launches bipartisan probe into insulin pricing @NicholasFlorko Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. What is it? What’s included? By Nicholas Florko Feb. 22, 2019 Reprints Washington Correspondent Nicholas Florko reports on the the intersection of politics and health policy. He is the author the newsletter “D.C. Diagnosis.” WASHINGTON — The heads of the influential Senate Finance Committee on Friday launched an investigation into the high price of insulin, demanding answers from the three manufacturers that control most of the global market for the drug: Eli Lilly, Sanofi and Novo Nordisk.The bipartisan investigation is the latest sign of Washington’s growing interest in the rising price of prescription drugs and highlights in particular the increasingly central role the Finance Committee is playing in that debate under its new chairman, Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa). The same panel will hear from seven drug industry CEOs — including Sanofi’s CEO Olivier Brandicourt — about the rising cost of drugs Tuesday. Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTEDcenter_img Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa), chairman of the Senate Finance Committee Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images Politics About the Author Reprints GET STARTED [email protected] Tags Congressdiabetesdrug pricing Log In | Learn More STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond.last_img read more

It’s only test tubes and mice, but Rubius Therapeutics hails first new data on red blood cell-derived cancer drugs

first_img By Adam Feuerstein April 2, 2019 Reprints @adamfeuerstein It’s only test tubes and mice, but Rubius Therapeutics hails first new data on red blood cell-derived cancer drugs Senior Writer, Biotech Adam is STAT’s national biotech columnist, reporting on the intersection of biotech and Wall Street. He’s also a co-host of “The Readout LOUD” podcast. Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED Ruby Wallau for STAT What is it? Log In | Learn More STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. GET STARTEDcenter_img Biotech Rubius Therapeutics (RUBY) is revealing for the first time Tuesday preclinical data to support efforts to transform red blood cells into new types of drugs that attack cancer.Before today, Rubius was best known for going public with a $2 billion valuation despite zero drugs in clinical trials. There was also that creative re-imagination of its pipeline chart. The results unveiled Tuesday are still from experiments in test tubes and mice, but for Rubius CEO Pablo Cagnoni, they demonstrate that genetically augmenting red blood cells with molecules and proteins to stimulate the immune system is possible. What’s included? [email protected] Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Adam Feuerstein About the Author Reprints Tags biotechnologyBostoncancerdrug developmentresearchlast_img read more